Right now Penguins fans are struggling with the results the team is getting. It is not so much the wins, it is the losses.

If the top two lines don't score then the team cannot win, at least that is the perception. It is a tough thing to measure because you don't know how many goals the bottom 6 are scoring when the top two lines have not. It also depends what your definition of secondary is.

I would classify it as the following: any of your bottom 6 scoring when your top 6 don't.

The idea being if you get scoring (goals and points) from both your top and bottom 6 you should win.

So who are Penguins players who have played a majority of their games in the bottom 6?

Brandon Sutter, Craig Adams, Zac Sill, Steve Downie, Beau Bennett, Marcel Goc

These are the players who have played in the bottom 6 the most through the season for the Penguins, obviously Goc has moved on, and Bennett has been injured for a while, but ostensibly this has been it.

You will notice that Blake Comeau and Nick Spalling are not in this collection, they have spent too much time up in top 6, and when Comeau comes back it will be interesting to see where both of these players filter into the line up.

So in the losses that were not shutouts here is how it panned out....

2015_02_10_Table.png

Lets take away the points where the top 6 were involved and the numbers start to get a little scarey.

2015_02_10_Bottom_6.png

31% of the points were carried by the bottom 6 in the losses, if we take the contribution of the top 6 away, it drops to 22%.

The Penguins need to find a way to get some secondary scoring, players who can get those points without the help of the top 6. That last loss against Chicago, both Crosby and Malkin were missing, the bottom 6 stood up and got the points on their own.

I have said it before, I do not think this season is too far away from being successful, unless the bottom 6, as currently constructed, start scoring they are going to have to start stop being scored against, because they are not contributing enough.

Thanks for reading.

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